Too many ideas?

 

I don’t actually think it’s possible to have too many ideas.  Too many ideas at the same time?  Yes, that could be a problem.  Learning to focus on one project and stick with it to the end isn’t a new problem for writers, and certainly isn’t one I haven’t faced before.  But, like any good villain/addiction, it keeps rearing its ugly head.

I must learn to narrow my focus from time to time.

And I have done this.  I did it for my web-series (and was set to shoot it when my producer/guy-giving-me-money-to-do-it bailed on me), and I did when I was submitting for the ABC Writing Fellowship.  And I do at work.

Deadlines.  That’s what these events have in common.  Well, how do you impose a self-inflicted deadline?  What am I going to do for myself if I achieve it?  What am I going to do if I don’t achieve it?  At the end of the day I’m not going to punish myself.

I like me too much for that.  #dumb

Instead, I’m trying to build healthy habits in my life.  One of them is daily writing.  If I can’t manage to focus this Gemini-addled brain, at least I can work it on the regular.  And by the sheer quantity of work I produce, I’m bound to finish something without a deadline.  Right?

-T2

PS: On a side note, here’s an excerpt from a recent short story I wrote for the Ventura County Writer’s Club Short Story Contest.

            Marnella Millhouse Maddison-MacGuffin was born with only one eye. “She only has her right eye,” people would say; which of course was ludicrous.  How can you have a right eye, if you’ve never had a left. It was simply put, her eye, and she was quite happy to call it that, thank you very much.

             “Who needs two eyes anyway,” she often thought. She could see as good as any dual-eyed person she knew. She often saw better than most, in fact, with the small exception of peripheral vision, but that’s why necks exist.

            And she could see as clear as day that stealing an Ogre’s treasure was a bad idea. But did anybody ask her what she thought of the plan? Of course not, that would have been smart.  

            “It’ll be alright Marney, there’s nothing to worry about.  Just go play with your dolls.” Well, she didn’t want to play with her dolls, and she didn’t want to go trouncing into the Ogre cave to rescue the morons either, but it was obvious that someone who could actually see what they were doing had to get involved.

            So, there she stood, knee deep in snow and ash, peering into the darkness of the Ogre cave, with her father’s broken sword by her side. The wind bit at her neck.  Couldn’t risk raising her hood. Whatever peripheral vision she had, she would need. 

            “Well, here goes,” she said as she entered the Ogre’s cave.

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My Son Turns One

 

The beginning is the hardest part to write.  Endings come easy, and depending on who the author is, can be filled with hope, promise, and a fulfillment only appreciated after taking the journey.  The ending is the reason we tell the story in the first place.  Tomorrow, my son will turn one.

Where to begin?

I am firmly in the second act of my life’s story, the “Complications” or “Rising Action.”  I’m a fan of the five act structure–mainly, so I can live longer–but also because I feel it’s the best way to get to the heart of the matter: my dénouement (or “catastrophe” for those of you who want to see me go out with a “bang.”)  T3 though?  No, he’s in Act One, the “Exposition.”

If one year of parenting has taught me anything, it is that the beginning can be just as exciting as the end, or the middle for that matter.  My son teaches me new things about myself every day–it’s a little frightening.  But it has made me a better person, and a better writer.  I now understand the feeling one gets when a whole other compartment of your heart, that you didn’t even know was there, fills up with an endless supply of unconditional love.  There is nothing I wouldn’t do to keep that perfect little boy safe.  My life changed forever on June 8th, 2012.

They are perfect, you know.  Our children.  They’re made that way.  And, as I see it, it is our job as parents to ensure they reach adulthood with as little “baggage” as possible.  Heroes with troubled pasts can help make for an exciting read, but not our children.  He should reach Act Two without so much as a broken bone…if only, right?

My wife has decided that his birthday party should have a Mickey Mouse Clubhouse theme as he’s quite the fan of Mickey.  So we’re having a “hot dog, hot dog, hot-digidy-dog” hot dog bar with condiments and potato salad.  I’m excited about the potato salad, and the few hotlinks I will be sneaking onto the grill.  And my son won’t remember it.

C’est la vie.

My act two has had an influx of rising action lately, as I said a few days ago, I’ve been writing a lot.  I submitted the spec script to several television production companies with the hope of earning a place in one of their writing programs.  I’m optimistic.  My friend, who’s working for a small independent production company, has asked me to write the script for a remake they are doing of a 70’s cult classic–to go unnamed for now–assuming they can get the rights.  It’s a “if we get paid, you get paid” kind of gig, but I like the challenge of reinventing something for a contemporary audience.  It’s going to be fun.  Also, I’m almost completely done the “outlining” and “thinking” stage of the next pilot I’m writing, so I’ll tell y’all more about “Eden” soon.

As for my “climax,” “falling action,” and “resolution?”  No one knows when they will die, or how–I just hope that one of the last things I see is my son’s smiling face.  Because whether my life takes a turn I’m unprepared for, or not–I will die a proud father, and that I’m okay with.

Updates…

I’ve been writing a lot.  Just not here.

I’ve submitted a spec script I wrote for the ABC show “Castle” to Disney/ABC’s Writing Fellowship, NBC/Universal’s Writer’s on the Verge, and to the WB Writer’s Workshop.  Here’s hoping.

“Ripley Madison” has been on the receiving end of a lot of neglect as I’ve been focusing on this as well as a new pilot I’m working on.  Also, I’ve been fine-tuning the “Star Trek” TV-series on the, more than likely, false hope that J.J. Abrams will ever be interested in reading/producing it.  🙂

So, I’ll write a new and full blog post in the next few days to keep y’all apprised as to what’s going on with me and the life that I lead.

Word.